How some men triple their risk of stroke

Mar 12,2014
Silent strokes may not show any outward symptoms, but they create small spots of dead cells in the brain. The cumulative effects of silent strokes include memory lapses, changes in mood and worse — an increased risk of having a major stroke.

Recent research shows that men with sleep apnea — a disorder often associated with heavy snoring at night with pauses in breathing — are three times as likely to suffer silent strokes.

The good news is that sleep apnea can be controlled, and the risk of stroke decreased. Join AmieJoe Roper, RN, stroke care coordinator for Samaritan Stroke Services as she explains the connection between strokes and sleep apnea. The seminar takes place Wednesday, March 19, 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, conference rooms A and B, in Corvallis. Call 541-768-5260 for more information.

This event is part of the Sleep Apnea Support Group which holds regular meetings throughout the year. It is sponsored by the Samaritan Sleep Disorders Center, and is open to anyone with sleep apnea, as well as their family and friends. New attendees are always welcome to join. More information is available at samhealth.org/Sleep or by calling 541-768-5260.