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Get the Facts about Addiction Recovery

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There’s no shortage of information about addiction recovery. The problem is, a lot of what is said is not accurate.

“There are so many myths about addiction,” said Kelley Story, operations director of Samaritan Treatment & Recovery Services, who sorts through some common myths and provides facts about recovery. 

Claim:  You have to hit rock bottom. 

Truth:  The recovery process can begin whenever someone decides they are ready to make a change. 

Claim:  After treatment, people return to happy lives.

Truth:  Sobriety isn’t always fun. And recovery is more complex than not using drugs and alcohol. It’s a process of change where people find purpose and learn to live in a healthy way. Many people struggle because of how deeply their lives were affected. 

Claim:  People who become addicted lack morality and willpower.

Truth:  There are enough barriers to recovery without shaming a person. Addiction is medical disorder. Recovery emerges from hope and the belief that people can overcome the challenges that confront them.

Claim:  Tough love is the antidote for co-dependence. 

Truth:  The right balance is detaching with love. People who are addicted need your support. Insist on being involved in their recovery, but set clear boundaries.

Claim:  You have to want to recover to succeed.

Truth:  For some people, getting treatment is a way to get others off their back. They may even intend to return to drugs or alcohol. In treatment, people change their way of thinking, modify behaviors, identify triggers and attain coping skills to prevent relapse. Recovery is a discipline; you “just do it.”

Claim:  There is only one path to recovery. 

Truth:  Just like there are many pathways to addiction, there are many ways to get clean and stay sober. People are unique, with distinct needs, strengths, preferences, goals, cultures and backgrounds. These factors affect and determine a person’s recovery. 

“September is National Recovery Month and we want to celebrate those who are on the difficult road to recovery,” said Story. “It takes family, friends and a community that cares to offer hope for a better life.”

Learn more about about Samaritan Treatment & Recovery Services.